Escapism

A few days ago I met two good friends of mine. We exchanged our news over a minimalistic, but dirt-expensive dinner, and sooner or later we came to my new writing career. While talking about books and my writing efforts, one of my friends tells me that she knows she won’t like my books.

Let’s talk about sex

Couple

It’s Tuesday evening, past 11, and my friend and I are still discussing the topic I brought up. She looks at me over a half full glass of Bellini and says, “You could still copy EL James… Take each third word, no one will point fingers at you for copycatting and it would still be a good sex scene.”

We are, of course, talking about writing sex scenes in my books.

Cliffhangers, or not?

cliffhangerI know I keep repeating myself, but I’ve almost finished the book #1. Almost.

What I’d like to cover in this (quick) post is the ending: should it be a complete ending of Book #1 with final conclusion or a cliffhanger. As a reader, I HATE cliffhangers! But also, as a reader, if they’re done well, I’m hooked and I’m going to read the sequel.

As it looks right now, I’m going to write a cliffhanger in book #1.

 

Alison Bechdel and a damsel in distress

I follow a blog which you might also find interesting, so here’s the link. This particular entry was about something called the Bechdel test. This was the first time I had heard of it and what it is about.

In short, this is a test about gender bias in fiction (books or movies). It’s a very simple test to perform. There are three questions that need to be answered:

 

  1. Are there at least two female characters in the story?
  2. Do they talk to each other?
  3. Do they talk to each other about something OTHER than men?

Book no.2: A surprise visit

It’s Friday night. I’m in my bed, tired. Must be close to midnight. Eyes closed. I want to sleep.

In my mind there is a scene running. It goes on and on. I think: “Fine, I’ll remember it. Now let me sleep! “

It still goes on, and on, and on.

Ahgrrr!

Is there a villain in you?

My characters need to be believable. That means I need to know what they are about, what are they going through, what have they experienced, what are their wishes, needs and expectations. To bigger or lesser extent I need to know them.

So – the question then is – how do I write about a villain?